Scatter Plots and Linear Regression INB Pages

Linear regression was a tricky topic for my Algebra 2 students!  While my students understood the concept, they struggled using the calculator.

I actually spent three days teaching them about scatter plots and linear regression.  While we worked through the longgg lesson, my students filled in this flipbook.

When an Algebra 2 student is learning statistics, scatter plots and linear regression are at the top of the list! This flipbook activity is a simple way for students to organize their notes. There is room for vocabulary, the prediction equation, and the line of regression.

On the first day, I talked students through the vocabulary.  My students were not very familiar with the vocabulary used.  The last time they had seen any statistics was in Pre-Algebra and it was a few years prior for them.  I also showed them how to make scatter plots on the calculator.  We made up numbers to practice typing in data, and then I gave them a small dataset and had them type it in themselves.  They talked and worked with their partner.  When students work on computers or calculators, always have them in partners!  It helps cut down on the number of questions.  Many of my students were a little gun shy about using their calculator (afraid of messing up), so this took awhile.

When an Algebra 2 student is learning statistics, scatter plots and linear regression are at the top of the list! This flipbook activity is a simple way for students to organize their notes. There is room for vocabulary, the prediction equation, and the line of regression.

Then, for the rest of class, we started working on writing prediction equations.  Of course, we were cut off by the bell!  My students didn't find prediction equations difficult, and we cruised through it quickly (even though I had to split it over two days).

Then, came lines of regression.  My students understood the concept, but they STRUGGLED with actually finding the line of regression.  My students always struggle with calculator skills.  We practiced, but I knew they would need another day of practice.

The THIRD DAY I gave my students a practice worksheet of problems.  They worked in groups so they could answer each other's questions.  That worked pretty well, because I tried to mix up the groups of kids that were quick on the calculator with those that needed a little more help.

I rarely spend THREE DAYS on one lesson, but I think it helped my students feel more confident.

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