9 Fun Ways to Review Multiple Choice Questions

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Ugh, TEST PREP!  With state testing looming, students NEED practice with multiple choice questions.  Multiple choice questions are bor-ing, but practicing doesn't have to be!  These 9 ways to review multiple choice questions might just be the ticket to keep your students engaged in class.

These fun activities for practicing multiple choice questions will help prep your students for state testing.  Check out these strategies so to keep your students engaged and focused while preparing for their end of course tests and final exams!

1 - Page Protectors
If you want to have students to have a copy of the questions, make a class set.  Then, put the pages in page protectors.  You could have students "race" to see who can get the most correct answers in a certain amount of time.  I've used cheap sheet protectors in the past, and they have worked fine.  If cost is an issue, I prefer these (affpage protectors.  However, if you want something to last more than one school year, I highly recommend these awesome (affdry erase sleeves.

2 - Stations Mazes
Stations mazes are great because they get students up and moving around the room.  They also encourage students to check their work carefully since an incorrect answer will eventually send them back to a problem they have already solved.  Successfully completing a maze requires students to slow down and check their work.  Best of all, they require NO PREP and are READY TO PRINT!

3 - Pose-Pause-Pounce-Bounce
This actually reminds me of "popcorn reading" from when I was a student.  First, the teacher POSEs a question and PAUSEs for at least 5 or ten seconds.  The pause needs to be long enough for most students to come up with an answer.  Then, the teacher POUNCEs on (chooses) a student at random to answer the question.  Once the student has answered, they BOUNCE to another student to ask them "What do you think of my answer?"

4 - Kahoot!
If you're wanting to incorporate technology, Kahoot is a fun game for students.  It's great for students to practice speed.  It would also be fun for students to work in teams to find the fastest team!

5 - ABCD Cards
Give each student a set of four cards.  Each card has a different letter (A, B, C, and D).  Display the questions on the board and have students (or groups of students) hold up the card for the correct answer.  You could also change it up by doing this for true and false questions or always, sometimes, never questions in geometry.  If you would like your own set of ABCD cards, you can download a FREE set at the bottom of this post!

6 - ABCD Corners
This activity takes the ABCD cards a step further.  Each corner of the room can be labeled A, B, C, or D.  Then, a question is read and students move to the corner of the correct answer.  You can also randomly call on students to defend their answers from the different corners.

These fun activities for practicing multiple choice questions will help prep your high school students for state testing.  Check out these strategies so to keep your students engaged and focused while preparing for their end of course tests and final exams!

7 - Students Write the Questions
Have students to write test questions with multiple choice answers, in a format consistent with their state exams.  Challenge students to come up with good distractor answers.  Students will have the opportunity to evaluate the course topics, reflect on what they do and don't understand, and determine good test items.  As an extension, students could trade questions and answer each other's questions!  I like to buy the giant bags of Jolly Rancher candies and pass them out to students that are correct.  You can get a great deal on huge bags of (affJolly Ranchers on Amazon.

8 - Find the Errors and Fix Them
Grading multiple choice practice doesn't really involve much critical thinking on the student's part.  However, if you give a student a completed quiz that another "student" has taken and tell them "Six of these answers are wrong.  Find the mistakes and correct them." there is much more critical thinking needed for the student.  Make your students grade so that they will more deeply consider all the content!

9 - Plickers
Have you heard of Plickers?  The website provides you with a free set of cards you can print.  Each card has its own unique barcode.  You can ask students for responses to multiple choice questions during class and you can scan the room with your phone to determine how many students answered correctly, as well as other statistics.

These fun activities for practicing multiple choice questions will help prep your students for state testing.  Check out these strategies so to keep your students engaged and focused while preparing for their end of course tests and final exams!

I hope some of these tips will help you and your students make it through this test prep season!  I know review time can be a huge challenge!

Download your FREE Set of ABCD Cards!


Area Formulas Discovery Activity

Every year I try to do a better job of helping students understand the formulas for finding area.  Students always try to teach it as a matching game.  The shape looks like this, use this formula, plug in numbers.  I want them to UNDERSTAND where the formulas are coming from.

I’ve done investigations and discovery activities before, but I think sometimes simple can be powerful.  (Have you seen my post about the wordless Pythagorean Theorem proof?)  

You can do this discovery activity under a document camera and have students discuss as a class or you could make this into a worksheet and have them complete it with a partner or a group.  I like to do this as a whole class activity and show the pieces under the document camera.


First, cut a piece of paper into two rectangles.  Label the sides.

area of rectangle discovery activity

Have students determine the area of the whole rectangle.  To do this, they will need to add the bases of the two smaller rectangles.

Cut along one the diagonal of one of the rectangles.  Now, the rectangle can be manipulated to make new shapes.

area of parallelogram discovery activity

Move the pieces to make a parallelogram.  Find the area of the parallelogram.  Show students that it’s still the same area, but that you need the base and height of the original rectangle in order to find the area of the parallelogram.  How does this compare to the area of the rectangle?

area of parallelogram discovery activity

Move the pieces to make a trapezoid.  Show students that they need to write the area equation as the sum of the two smaller rectangles.  Then, show them how that relates to the formula of the area of a trapezoid.  The reason the 1/2 is in the formula is because the z appears twice in the base of the trapezoid.

area of trapezoid discovery activity


After that, you can cut the pieces further and manipulate more, if you wish.  I like to model all of this and do it with my students, because I have many that give up halfway through.  Also, I can point out little things along the way that they may not have noticed for themselves.

a discovery activity for the areas of rectangles, parallelograms, and trapezoids - helps students investigate and visualize the formulas

8 Interactive Notebook Tips to Save Your Sanity

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Whether you've been using interactive notebooks for a long time or you're a newbie, you will run into problems that will drive you nuts.  Right now, my biggest annoyance is students leaving their glue bottles open when they put them away.  Ugh.  If you know how to magically get teenaged boys to slow down enough to take care of craft supplies, I'm all ears!

Teachers, these interactive notebook tips will save your sanity and keep you happy!  These tips will help you train your students to take good notes, while keeping your life manageable.

To help you stay sane in your classroom, I'm sharing my top 8 tips for interactive notebooks.

1 - Save everything as a PDF.  Several times, I've re-opened a document that's been formatted for their notebooks only to find it messed up.  I've also had graphics disappear.  Can I tell you how maddening it is to have 15 intricately drawn geometry diagrams just disappear and be replaced with a giant red X?  Also, if you make something with a cute font at home, it likely won't show up on your school computer.  PDFs are a lifesaver.

2 - Easy is best.  When I use foldables, I love hamburger books and flap books.  My kids know what to do with those without me explaining.  I use other types of foldables too, but I recommend using one or two types all the time so that you don't have to give instructions every day.

3 - Give students a choice as often as possible.  This is just good classroom management advice.  However, it works well with their notebooks too.  Sometimes I let students choose the color of paper for their next foldable.  (Lots of people like BRIGHT paper in their notebooks.  My students find that distracting and hard to read their pencil writing, so I really like this pastel paper.)  Other times, I let them choose what kind of review activity we will do.  Students are more engaged when they have choices.  Give them choices you can live with.

4 - Model the "extras".  Kids won't "make it their own" and add extra information unless you model it.  Sometimes I quickly outline a white foldable with a highlighter before class.  Show them how to add extra information in their notes by letting them see you do it.  They will start to mimic what they see.

Teachers, these interactive notebook tips will save your sanity and keep you happy!  These tips will help you train your students to take good notes, while keeping your life manageable.

5 - If something isn't working, dump it.  A table of contents didn't really work for me.  I would forget to add to it and wouldn't refer to it myself.  So, I quit.  I've thought about trying tabs, but I don't really see the point.  My students can quickly flip to the pages from this unit and it's much easier for me to say "Remember that giant purple foldable?" than try to remember the page everything is on.  Also, sometimes kids don't remember what a topic is called.  What would they do then?

6 - Go with composition notebooks.  They are so much more durable.  HOWEVER, I have a friend that uses the large size 5-star notebooks with the plastic front, like these.  They work pretty well too.

7 - Don't check notebooks all the time!  Just the thought of checking notebooks makes my head spin.  If you insist on checking them, DO NOT TAKE THEM HOME.  Just say no!  I check them once per grading period.  They pass their notebook to a neighbor and the neighbor fills out a tiny sheet that grades them on all pages being glued in and foldables filled out.  Kids either get a 100 or a 50.  It's the easiest grade for them all quarter.  It takes me less than 3 minutes.  DO NOT TAKE THEM HOME TO GRADE.

8 - You must have a teacher copy.  I keep a teacher copy, but I don't make it ahead of time.  I actually make my notebook along with the students and I have one for each class period.  It helps me model what to do in their notebook and I fill in their notes under the document camera.  If a student is absent, they can borrow my notebook (in class!) to copy the notes.  It makes life so much easier to have a sample.

Teachers, these interactive notebook tips will save your sanity and keep you happy!  These tips will help you train your students to take good notes, while keeping your life manageable.

Do you have any tips that make using interactive notebooks easier?


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