Polynomial Division INB Pages

Dividing polynomials usually overwhelms my Algebra 2 students at first.  So over the years, I've found that teaching it over two days helps SO MUCH.  I always teach polynomial long division on the first day and synthetic division on the second day.

As the warmup, I write a couple of fourth-grade style long division problems on the board.  After the initial freak out, I typically have a few students that remember the process that step up and help the class.

This was the first year that I taught this lesson using interactive notebooks.  I thought about creating a fancy foldable for this topic, but I really thought that just going through the algorithm a couple of times would be enough to help everyone catch on. 

I created a hamburger book for polynomial long division.  It started with dividing a polynomial by a monomial.  There are additional problems inside the hamburger book. 

I used these interactive notebooks pages for teaching polynomial long division and synthetic division.  My algebra 2 students liked these dividing polynomials notes.

Then the next day, we worked on synthetic division.  My kids usually have a brain explode moment when I do the first problem.  This year I made them put their pencils down and just WATCH me do the first one.  They seemed to catch on quicker.  I also used a hamburger book for this lesson. 

I used these interactive notebooks pages for teaching polynomial long division and synthetic division.  My algebra 2 students liked these dividing polynomials notes.

Dividing Polynomials: Long Division Hamburger Book
Dividing Polynomials: Synthetic Division Hamburger Book


4 comments

  1. Hi, how do I get access to your long division and synthetic division hamburger book? I would graetly appreciate it. Thanks

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  2. How do you use "traditional notes," with your interactive notebook?

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    1. I use traditional notes sometimes. This particular lesson is pretty traditional. It's pretty much only typed out because I feel like I can't trust students to copy problems down correctly. I normally just go through it "lecture style" and have students answer questions as we go. I do have students take their own notes at times and don't give them anything to glue in. Those days, they just write what I write in my notebook. It's pretty much like an old school chalkboard lesson, except I use my notebook instead of the chalkboard. I use a document camera, so they just copy what I write.

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