Expanding and Condensing Logs Practice


One of my standard “tools” to get students to practice a kind of boring skill is to get out the mini-whiteboards and let them write with markers.  For some reason, students think whiteboards are super exciting.

Expanding and Condensing Logs Whiteboard Practice - powerpoint to use for in-class practice


Every year, I have my students practice expanding and condensing logarithmic expressions LOTS before we actually start solving equations.  I find that lots of practice makes the equations a little less painful.  I’ve used this powerpoint as practice every year.  It includes both expanding and condensing expressions.  If whiteboards aren’t enough to motivate your kids, sometimes setting a timer with an arbitrary amount of time helps too :)

Expanding and Condensing Logs Whiteboard Practice - powerpoint to use for in-class practice
Expanding and Condensing Logs Whiteboard Practice - powerpoint to use for in-class practice
Expanding and Condensing Logs Whiteboard Practice - powerpoint to use for in-class practice

Expanding and Condensing Logs Whiteboard Practice - powerpoint to use for in-class practice

Expanding and Condensing Logs Whiteboard Practice - powerpoint to use for in-class practice

 photo signature_zpsd49f9155.png

I'll Never Do That!


Just for fun, I asked some of my teacher friends what some things they swore they would never do, but then, of course, did once they became teachers.

When I'm a Teacher, I'll Never...  Teachers share what they swore they'd never do!


Sit in groups. I always had rows of desk, but this year after much thought about what kind of learning I want to happen in my room, I put my tables into groups of four. There is more conversation, but there is also more collaboration.


I thought I would never "shush" students saying "SHHHHH!" I noticed as a student that it didn't work and sounded so ridiculous to me. I hate the fact that I do find myself doing it, even though it is definitely not the most effective way to quiet a class or get attention.


If we finish a couple of minutes early, I let students line up at the door. Some battles aren't worth fighting.


Never eat in my classroom! But my first year our lunch time was so late, we were last ones to go to lunch so I let my students bring snacks and eat. They do know they have to clean up afterwards or they lose that privilege. But I do tell them they cannot bring in a Big Mac or Fried Chicken!


I was adamant about not becoming a teacher, because teachers collect trash to reuse in their classrooms for various projects. So I became a teacher. Not only did I collect trash (wine bottles and tissue paper for fabulous Mother’s Day projects), I also collected an enormous class library, videos and DVD’s for the class, 20 class sets of novels, and I also yearly bought 60-120 notebooks, pencils, erasers, and binder paper for my students. I spent a bloody fortune on teaching supplies and that included modifying a metal cart with locking doors to store my laptop, LCD projector, and Document Camera. My collection of books and DVDs and videos fills boxes lining the wall from floor to ceiling in my garage. 


I swore I would never give out a detention, restriction, demerit, etc.  Never.  I truly believed that all issues could be handled with kindness, compassion, and LOGIC (and no, I don't have my own children yet).  And in my first years of teaching, this was easy!  I taught at an all-girls Catholic high school.  My biggest discipline issue was girls not wearing their socks high enough ... teaching heaven?  Yes.  But then.  Then I moved down to teaching middle school and this worldview went right out the window the first time my boys got into a fight at recess!  I still don't give detentions out very often, and if you get one from me, you know you did some seriously wrong.  But sometimes, you just have to hand those bad boys out! 
Caitlin  


I swore I'd never ask, "basic" questions. I wanted my students to delve deep into the material, not just memorize who did what on page 13. Here's the problem. I found my student's weren't retaining the information in the text enough to dig deeper! Turns out there's a time and a place for "easy" questions, and they aren't just busywork.


Get really excited and start dancing when you hear the Bill Nye theme song in class. (Yes, high school students still love Bill Nye!) 
Becca   


I swore I'd never let students do math in pen. A teacher pointed out to me the other day that international tests and AP exams are done in pen. So, here I am, letting students do math in pen. I cringe each time I see it in pen, but I'm sure I'll get use to it. Thankfully, most students still prefer to do it in pencil....those are my favorite students...LOL, just kidding.


Is there something that you swore you'd never do, but find yourself doing now that you're a teacher?  Share in the comments!

photo signature_zpsd49f9155.png

Classifying Conics INB


Classifying conics is always a fun lesson for me to teach.  For me, this is the last lesson of my conics unit.  I try to keep the actual lesson as short as possible.  I've found that a flow chart works very well to help students organize their information for this lesson.

Classifying Conics Interactive Notebook Page Idea

If I get to teach Algebra 2 or Pre-Cal again, this is what I would use as an interactive notebook page for this lesson.  I wouldn't use a foldable at all, and would just have students draw the flowchart in their notebooks.

Classifying Conics Interactive Notebook Page Idea


Classifying Conics Interactive Notebook Page Idea

 photo signature_zpsd49f9155.png
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Powered by Blogger.
Back to Top