Parallel Lines with Transversals Interactive Notebook Page

26 September 2015

Parallel lines is such a fun unit to teach!  I don’t know why I like that unit in Geometry so much, but I do.  

Anyway, I have a interactive notebook page idea for you!

Parallel Lines with Transversals Foldable - an interactive notebook page idea for geometry

First, I would use my Parallel Lines with Transversals Foldable from my TpT store.  There are flaps for each of the types of angles in parallel lines.  Each flap has a definition, diagram, theorem, and practice problem.

Parallel Lines with Transversals Foldable - an interactive notebook page idea for geometry

Parallel Lines with Transversals Foldable - an interactive notebook page idea for geometry

I like to have the students color-code the location of the types of angles.  I wrote a blog post last school year about using color with purpose, and this is an example of when I do that.

I like that this foldable is small enough that something else can be included at the bottom of the page.  It is important to me to include simple proofs of theorems.  So, at the bottom of this page, I chose to include the proof of the Alternate Interior Angles Theorem.  Whenever I do fill in the blank style proofs with my students, I always write everything I would give them in black.  Then, I write everything I would expect them to be able to do in another color.  Again, using color with purpose.

Parallel Lines with Transversals Foldable - an interactive notebook page idea for geometry

This page includes A LOT of information all in one place!  It could be overwhelming for students to do it all in one day, so it might be best for your students to take more than one class period to complete this page.


I hope this gives you some ideas for your own parallel lines with transversals page!

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Teaching Proofs with Proof Cut-Out Activities

12 September 2015

So you want to know how to rock teaching proofs?  Proofs cut-out activities are hands down my favorite activity for teaching proofs.

Teaching Geometry Proofs with Cut-Out Activities | mrseteachesmath.blogspot.com

I’ve found that at the very beginning, students need lots of modeling to see how to solve proofs.  Then, when I release them to practice on their own, they often stare at the page.  That’s where cut-out activities come in.  Basically, they are a low stress way for students to practice.  Students kind of have a “word bank” with options to choose from and if they make a mistake they don’t have to erase a million times.


Here’s how they work:

  • I give my students three or four proofs with all the statements and reasons needed for the proofs, jumbled together.
  • The students cut all of them out and sort them into proofs.  Since they’re not writing anything, they can move the statements and reasons around quickly and easily.  
  • If students are struggling, I give them a sheet with hints (included in every proofs cut-out).  Usually, the hints page is enough to help them figure everything out themselves.
  • While students are working, I walk around, check their work, and try to clear up misconceptions.

Teaching Geometry Proofs with Cut-Out Activities | mrseteachesmath.blogspot.com

Teaching Geometry Proofs with Cut-Out Activities | mrseteachesmath.blogspot.com

Proofs cut-outs make it easier for students to make mistakes.  There’s no writing and erasing and writing and erasing and erasing while they’re learning.  Students can easily manipulate the statements and reasons with no record of mistakes.  In my classes, this has totally eliminated students staring off into space and feeling overwhelmed.

Teaching Geometry Proofs with Cut-Out Activities | mrseteachesmath.blogspot.com

Teaching Geometry Proofs with Cut-Out Activities | mrseteachesmath.blogspot.com

I have a few proof cut-out activities in my Teachers pay Teachers store.  Try one out; it will help your students!

geometry-proofs
Introductory Geometry Proofs Cut-Out Activity

geometry-proofs
Parallel Lines with Transversals Proofs Cut-Out Activity

geometry-proofs
Parallel and Perpendicular Lines Proofs Cut-Out Activity

geometry-proofs
Triangle Congruence Proofs Cut-Out Activity

geometry-proofs
Triangle Congruence and CPCTC Proofs Cut-Out Activity

geometry-proofs
Geometry Proofs Cut-Out Activity Bundle

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Where Were You on September 11th?

10 September 2015

Every generation has a historical moment that they will remember forever.  I will always remember where I was on September 11, 2001.  I was a sophomore in high school and had gotten to school early that day.  I heard people talking in the hall about a plane hitting a building in New York, but I didn’t really think much about it.  In my first period speech class, the principal announced what was happening over the loudspeaker.  My entire high school was silent.  We moved through the school day like normal, but watched news coverage in every class.  

Everyone has their own story to tell from this day.  A few of my friends shared theirs with me. 

Where were you on September 11th - A blog post of teacher's reflections

I was half-way through my undergrad. I had a new born baby and was in the apartment alone. I remember my mother calling and telling me to get diapers and gasoline. I watched the news before leaving for class, and saw the second tower get hit. By the time I got to my first class it was all everyone was talking about. Our classes ended up called off for the rest of the day.   Sarah Koves, Kovescence of the Mind  

On September 11, I was a senior in high school in New York City. It was a Tuesday, and I was enjoying a free period sitting in the lunchroom with a few friends. The radio was on and the DJ suddenly said there are reports coming in of a plane that crashed into the World Trade Center. We all stopped talking and listened to hear more. The DJ repeated himself. We immediately started wondering what this meant. Did the pilot have a stroke behind the controls? How could a plane not avert a skyscraper? Was it an accident? It must have been a prop plane giving a tour of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island and the controls must have malfunctioned. Of course it must have been an accident! Our lives changed when the second plane hit. Two planes is not an accident. That's when more facts started pouring in: they were commercial planes, they had been hijacked, we heard "Al-Quaeda" for the first time, the towers fell, and our world crashed around us. My math teacher's daughter worked in the WTC but thankfully made it out in time, a freshman lost her mom, many other students lost a parent or older sibling. One of my friends' mom had the amazing, "I went to the deli for a bagel instead of eating at the office cafeteria" story and she survived. Instead of being taught economics in 3rd period we learned what Al-Quaeda was. Instead of studying Shakespeare in 4th period we learned about the plane in the Pennsylvania Field and the Pentagon. We were scared, we wondered what else was going to happen, and we questioned the motives of the terrorists. We had to wait for a parent to pick us up before we could leave the building. I will never forget driving across the bridge heading home to Long Island and seeing a hole in downtown and black smoke still rising. I will never forget how for 24 hours the TV news kept showing footage of the man jumping and falling headfirst to his death, and even at 17 years old questioning why they kept and kept and kept replaying his death. I will never forget learning about the immeasurable loss suffered by Cantor Fitzgerald. I will never forget hearing the recordings of those on the PA field plane speaking to their loved ones or leaving messages for the last time. My parents remember in as much detail where they were when we landed on the moon, I have 9/11.   Stephanie's History Store  

I was teaching. The bell had just rung for lunch and a neighbouring teacher ran into my room and yelled "Terrorists are attacking America!" (We're Canadian). I was totally confused...how could that be? I ran to the staffroom where they had taken in a TV, and the room was in complete silence. Everyone was in utter disbelief. I'll never forget it.   Room 213  

September 11th began like any other day, except the radio announced a plane had hit a tower in New York. How sad. It wasn’t till I was on my way to work an hour later that the car radio announced a 2nd plane had crashed into another tower in New York. I started to cry. It wasn’t an accident, it was deliberate. I knew a profound sorrow and grief. The teachers at work were milling about talking about the event transpiring in New York. I immediately arranged all the teachers on my floor to congregate the students in several rooms to watch the news on the few T.V.’s we shared. It took the District 30 minutes to ban all news broadcasts about the terrorist event, but by then all the 6th grade teachers on the 3rd floor and our students were on the same page and had the same information. We could help our students understand what had happened that day. It helped to process this terrorist event as a group, and not be whispering tidbits in the hallway about what each of us learned piecemeal.   A. C. Sandler  


To me, September 11th is a day to remember those who died in the attacks and in the war resulting from the attacks.  As you move through your day, give a thought or prayer for those whose lives were permanently changed by this event.

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Biconditional Statements Interactive Notebook Page

06 September 2015

I always teach Biconditional Statements as a separate lesson from Conditional Statements.  I think it flows nicely into teaching theorems.  Also, the lesson is relatively short, so it is a great way to have students review theorems that they have learned so far, while still practicing new material.

The interactive notebook page that I would use for this lesson isn’t very fancy, but I think it serves it’s purpose well.

Mrs. E Teaches Math:  Biconditional Statements Interactive Notebook Page for Geometry (Logic)

The part in red marker is something I would have the students write with their partner.  I would also have them do the example with their partner.

Mrs. E Teaches Math:  Biconditional Statements Interactive Notebook Page for Geometry (Logic)

Mrs. E Teaches Math:  Biconditional Statements Interactive Notebook Page for Geometry (Logic)

The rest of the class period, I would have students review and practice in small groups.


Do you have and ideas that you particularly like when teaching biconditional statements?  Share in the comments!

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